Book 'n Tea Break











{December 10, 2011}   Bumped

Title: BumpedBumped Bookcover

Author: Megan McCafferty

MLA Citation: McCafferty, Megan. Bumped. New York: Balzer + Bray, 2011. Print.

Annotation: When a virus causes everyone over the age of eighteen to be infertile, teen pregnancy goes from being something everyone looks down on to the only way to reproduce. Melody, a girl taking advantage of her fertility, meets her twin, Harmony, a girl raised in a religious family, wind up on an adventure they never could have imagined.

Booktalk: In a world where teen pregnancy is the only way to reproduce, would you be willing to reproduce with someone solely based on their genetics and trade your baby for money, tuition, etc.? Or would you still believe that their is something sacred about having a baby? These are the two sides Melody and Harmony are on. But when a case of mistaken identity happens, the two girls learn much more about themselves other than they share the same DNA.

Straight from the Teens: Lisa (16) says While there are many similarities in this book to The Giver, I really like how McCafferty didn’t just info-dump on you.”

(Images Courtesy of GoodReads)



{December 10, 2011}   Nineteen Eighty-Four

Title: Nineteen Eighty-Four

Author: George Orwell

MLA Citation: Orwell, George. Nineteen Eighty-Four. New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1949. Print.Nineteen Eighty-Four Bookcover

Awards/Honors: Waterstones Books of the Century (1997, No 2)
Time’s All-Time 100 Novels selection
Prometheus Award (Hall of Fame, 1984)
The Modern Library’s 100 Best Novels: The Board’s List (13)
The Modern Library’s 100 Best Novels: The Reader’s List (6)
Radcliffe Publishing Course Top 100 Novels of the 20th Century (9)
The Observer’s 100 Greatest Novels of All Time (59)
New York Times Bestseller (Fiction, 1949)
Larry McCaffery’s 20th Century Greatest Hits (30)
Anthony Burgess: 99 Novels (1949)
Guardian 1000 (Science Fiction & Fantasy)
The Telegraph’s 110 Best Books: The Perfect Library (2008)
Newsweek’s Top 100 Books: The Meta-List (2009, No. 2)
Locus 1987 Poll, All-Time Best SF Novel (34)
Locus 1975 Poll, All-Time Best Novel (41)
The 100 Most Influential Books Ever Written: The History of Thought from Ancient Times to Today (1949)
New York Public Library’s Books of the Century (09|Utopias & Dystopias)
Locus 1998 Poll, All-Time Best SF Novel Before 1990 (21)
Classical Christian Education Great Books (American and Modern)
David Pringle’s Best 100 Science Fiction Novels (1)
Horror: Another 100 Best Books (30)
Cyril Connolly’s 100 Key Books of the Modern Movement (1949)
The Telegraph’s 100 novels everyone should read (21)
501 Must-Read Books (Science Fiction)
Classics of Science Fiction (16)
The Essential Man’s Library: 100 Must-Read Books
Bloomsbury’s 100 Must-Read Science Fiction Novels
Le Monde’s 100 Books of the Century (22)

Annotation: Winston lives in a world where everything is controlled by Big Brother. His normal feelings of love and disagreement are crimes in Oceania, though, and he must choose between suppressing them or risking imprisonment and torture.

Booktalk: How would you feel if Big Brother watched your every move? Winston works for the Ministry of Truth, altering history to fit the needs of the Party. His natural feelings of love toward Julia can get him imprisoned. His disagreement with the altering of history can get him imprisoned. One flicker, one word to the wrong person can get him imprisoned. How would you feel if even a flickering thought could lead to your imprisonment and torture?

Straight from the Teens: Brittany (15) says I am always so amazed [when reading older books] how many things that they put into their futuristic world have either come true. I often wonder if scientists are inspired by the books.”

(Images Courtesy of GoodReads)



{December 10, 2011}   The Hunger Games Movie Trailer

The Hunger Games has been made into a movie! What types of changes do y0u think the movie will make to the book?

Straight from the Teens: Glen (17) says I can’t wait to see The Hunger Games movie. I want to see how they adapted the book for the big screen.”



{December 9, 2011}   The Hunger Games

Title: The Hunger Games

Author: Suzanne Collins

MLA Citation: Collins, Suzanne. The Hunger Games. New York: Scholastic Press, 2008. Print.

Awards/Honors: #1 New York Times Bestseller
Publisher’s Weekly’s Best Books of 2008: Children’s FictionThe Hunger Games Bookcover
New York Times Notable Children’s Book of 2008
ALA Top ten Best Books for Young Adults Selection
Indies Choice – Best Indie Young Adult Buzz Book Honor
Cybil Award – Fantasy & Science Fiction (2008)
Children’s Choice Book Award (2009)
YALSA’s Teens’ Top Ten (2009)
Kirkus Best Book of 2008

Annotation: Katniss Everdeen and Peeta Mellark are competing against teens from the other Panem districts in the Hunger Games, an event televised to all the districts. These are no ordinary games, though – the contestants must fight to the death.

Booktalk: Every year Panem holds The Hunger Games, a fight-to-the-death televised competition that The Capitol uses to remind the Districts of the power they have over them and commemorate the ending of the Dark Days. Twelve through eighteen-year-olds have their names entered every year into the drawing – and they can enter their name more times every year to get rations for their family. Katniss has twenty entries at the age of sixteen. Gale, her hunting partner and friend, has fourty-two names at age eighteen. The odds are not in their favor. When Katniss ends up a Hunger Games tribute, she must fight for her life.

Straight from the Teens: Kaleb (14) says “The Hunger Games really got me to start reading. I just couldn’t imagine being in the tributes position. Or the government forcing their people to do this!!”

(Images Courtesy of GoodReads)



{December 9, 2011}   Ship Breaker

Title: Ship Breaker

Author: Paolo Bacigalupi

Illustrator: Nathan Hale

MLA Citation: Bacigalupi, Paolo. Ship breaker. New York: Little, Brown, 2010. Print.

Awards/Honors:National Book Award for Young People’s Literature  Nominee (2010)
Andre Norton Award for Young Adult Science Fiction and Fantasy Nominee (2011)
Michael L. Printz Award for Best Young Adult Novel  (2011)

Annotation: Nailer works breaking down old ships, pulling copper with his crew as they struggle to meet quota and stay small enough to keep their jobs. After a city killer comes through, however, Nailer makes a discovery that could end his days hauling copper.

Booktalk: Nailer works for Bapi’s light crew, scavenging metal from the inside of ships. After a city killer blows in, Nailer and his friend and crew boss, Pima, make a discovery that would allow them to quit light crew for good – a swank’s clipper ship that crashed ashore. There is another surprise waiting for them within the clipper, however, complicating things beyond gathering their scavenge before others move in.

Straight from the Teen: Danny (17) says, “I liked this book a lot because the dystopian society is believable and it takes place in the U.S.”

(Images Courtesy of GoodReads)



{October 30, 2011}   The Giver

Title: The Giver

Author: Lois Lowry

MLA Citation: Lowry, Lois. The giver. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1993. Print.

Awards/Honors: ALA’s 100 Most Frequently Challenged Books of 1990-2000The Giver bookcover
ALA’s Best Book for Young Adults
Newbery Medal (1994)
School Library Journal “Best Book of the Year”
William Allen White Award (1996)

Annotation: In Jonas’ world, you do not decide what you want to be when you grow up – it is decided for you. When Jonas is given the job as the Receiver of Memories, he learns from The Giver the secrets of the community he believed was perfect.

Booktalk: What happens when you realize the world isn’t perfect? For Jonas, this idea has never crossed his mind. Yet when he is assigned the job of Receiver of Memories, The Giver opens Jonas’ eyes to the sacrifices the community makes to live in a perfect world. What would you do when you learned the price of perfect?

Straight from the Teens: Glen (17), says “This is one of the best dystopian novel I’ve read. I recommend it every chance I get!”

(Images Courtesy of GoodReads)



et cetera